Traditional Catholic, Marine Corps Retired, American. That says it ALL!
Life Of A United States Marine

Ahhhh... this explains much!

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First a wee bit about me. I'm a retired Master Sergeant of Marines. 20 fun filled years of lifting weights, running long distances with a pack on me back, blowin' stuff up and sendin' rounds down range... and I got paid for it!! Who says there isn't a God?!

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Lemme see... it all started in 1977 at the 2d Recruit Training Battalion, San Diego, California. Plt 2087.. Senior Drill Instructor Sgt Robinson, Drill Instructor Sgt Rienbold, Drill Instructor Sgt Poteet. Sheesh, you can always tell if the DI's did their job if you can remember their names! From Boot Camp, I was off to 7th Eng Bn up in Camp Pendleton. I volunteered for Sea Duty in '79. I had visions of Aircraft Carriers and Battleships. Lo and behold, I get orders to the Marine Detatchment, USS Canopus (AS-34) a SUB TENDER of all things! Well, it made sense... they had nukes aboard. Anytime ya got nukes, ya got Marine Corps Security.

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From there it was off to Camp Pendleton again, Instructor Duty at the 1st FSSG NCO Academy. Great tour. Runnin' up and down the mountains all day, bangin' weights, teaching Land Nav, more running, Assistant Drill Master, lifting more weights... what a dream tour that was! From Pendleton, I just HAD to volunteer for DI Duty. Seeing that my loving wife is from South Carolina, I tried to get stationed on the other side of the country, Parris Island to be exact. The Monitor up at HQMC was pretty decent about it, so BACK to the East Coast again.

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DI Duty was without a doubt, the roughest tour I ever served. I dropped from a studly 175 to an anorexic 140. My wife figured that I worked between 80 and 104 hours a week. But hey... seeing those spastic, "me" centered, selfish civilian pukes turn into self sacrificing, dedicated United States Marines made it all worth it.

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After my tour on The Island, I really screwed up and volunteered for Joint Service with the Army. Nothing against the Army, God bless 'em, but for a fire breathing, newly promoted, young Staff Sergeant fresh of DI Duty, getting stationed at a base where the CG ORDERED that no one actually iron their uniform!!?? Where I was ORDERED to never raise my voice to soldiers!!?? Instead, I was expected to "understand where their coming from". In the vernacular of todays youth... "screw dat". Well, at least I know I have 3 years coming off my time in Purgatory.

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Now it was time for an overseas pump. I really didn't look forward to saying goodbye to my family for a year, but I knew that came with the job. It was bad enough that I was 8,000 miles away from my family for 12 month, but I was assigned to the pouge job to end all pouge jobs... Company Gunny for H&S Co, H&S Bn, 3d FSSG. Oh well, there's another year off of Purgatory.

Ahhh... back stateside. 8th Eng Bn, Camp Lejeune. Not bad duty. It was there that we all went to the Big Cax in the East (otherwise known as The Gulf War, Part 1). I was assigned first to the 8th Engineer Battalion, then as the Engineer Chief for FSSG (fwd). Bored to death 99% of the time, scared to death 1% of the time. But seeing the faces of the liberated Kuwaiti people when we went into Kuwait City made it all worth it.

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After 183 days of sand being in every conceivable orafice I had, it was back Stateside. A wee bit more in Lejeune, then I volunteered for a three year stint at the Marine Corps Security Forces Company at NAS, Patuxent River, MD. Secret stuff... can't talk about it... would hafta kill ya. Well, I guess I can say this... more "Security of Vital National Assets". In other words, "cross that line, and that young Lance Corporal will blow your brains out". GREAT tour!

OK, back to Lejeune for my "Twilight Tour". I fell into what was probably the best tour ever had... Director for the Corporals Leadership Course. It was there that I realized something... in the Army, it's the junior Officers that make the decisions, in the Navy, it's the Chiefs, The Chair Force... probably some GS-11. But God help the Marine Corps if we EVER get away from our young Corporals and Sergeants being the ones who make things happen where the proverbial rubber hits the road. I hate to admit it, but I always took young Corporals and Buck Sergeants for granted. I honestly believe that if The Corps ever ceases to hold NCOs responsible for the awesome tasks at hand, then The Corps is doomed to be nothing more than a smaller version of the US Army.

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Definition Of A U.S. Marine

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That Dirty Faced, Foul Mouthed, Always On The Verge Of Getting In Trouble, Foot Sore And Back Strong, Still Loves His Mama, Occasionally Visits The God Locker (Base Chapel) For Mass, Tattoo Wearin', Never Has Enough Money For a Phone Call Home But Always Has Enough For A Six-Pack, Bar Brawlin', Crazy About His Baby Brother And Sister, 18 Year Old Kid That Has Kept The Wolf Away From The Door Since 1775

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He Aint Heavy... He's My Brother Marine

A Marine Carries A Wounded Brother-In-Arms To Safety During Combat In Iraq

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Various Things Marines Have Said And What Has Been Said Of Us By Others

"My only answer as to why the Marines get the toughest jobs is because the average Leatherneck is a much better fighter. He has far more guts, courage, and better officers... These boys out here have a pride in the Marine Corps and will fight to the end no matter what the cost." - 2nd Lt. Richard C. Kennard, Peleliu, World War II. 1943

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"Our Country won't go on forever, if we stay as soft as we are now. There won't be any America - because some foreign soldiery will invade us and take our women and breed a hardier race." --Lieutenant General Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller. 1955

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"They're on our right, they're on our left, they're in front of us, they're behind us; they can't get away from us this time." - Chesty Puller, USMC, Chosin Reservoir, Korean War. 1951

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When an Army captain asked him for the direction of the line of retreat, Col Puller called his artillerymen, gave them the Army position, and ordered: "If they start to pull back from that line, even one foot, I want you to open fire on them." Turning to the captain, he replied "Does that answer your question? We're here to fight." At Koto-ri in Korea - Chesty Puller at Koto-ri in Korea. 1951

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"Retreat, hell! We just GOT here!!" - Capt Lloyd Williams at the Battle of Belleau Wood when ordered to fall back by the US Army. 1917

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"The American Marines are terribly reckless fellows... they would make very good storm troopers." - Unidentified German officer at Belleau Wood. 1917

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Marines know how to use their bayonets. Army bayonets may as well be paper-weights. [Navy Times; November 1994]

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"Do not attack the First Marine Division. Leave the yellowlegs alone. Strike the American Army instead." - Orders given to Communist troops in the Korean War; shortly afterward, the Marines were ordered to not wear their khaki leggings to keep the enemy from immediately fleeing

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"You cannot exaggerate about the Marines. They are convinced to the point of arrogance, that they are the most ferocious fighters on earth- and the amusing thing about it is that they are." - Father Kevin Keaney, 1st MarDiv Chaplain, Korean War. 1953

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"Why the hell can't the Army do it if the Marines can; they are all the same kind of men... why can't the Army be like the Marines?" --Commander in Chief, AEF, General John Pershing, U.S. Army. 1917

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We have two companies of Marines running rampant all over the northern half of this island, and three Army regiments pinned down in the southwestern corner, doing nothing. What the hell is going on? Gen. John W. Vessey Jr., USA, Chairman of the the Joint Chiefs of Staff; during the assault on Grenada, 1983

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The Corps, which has never lost sight that its primary mission is to fight, remains superbly trained and disciplined -- true to its time-honored slogan "We don't promise a rose garden." When, under Clinton, the Army lowered its standards to Boy Scout summer-camp level in order to increase enlistment, the Corps responded by making boot training longer and tougher -Col David Hackworth, US Army. 1997

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"Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they've made a difference to this world. The Marines don't have that problem."-Ronald Reagan

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"There are only two kinds of people that completely understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion." -Unknown-

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And Probably The Best Testimonial For The Corps....
The following is an excerpt from an email home from an Air Force ordnance demolition unit team member describing his first night at Kandahar airport:


"One of the perimeter positions only a hundred yards or so to our left took some incoming fire and we all went to general quarters, taking defensive fighting positions in our bivouac in case they penetrated to our position. The Marines quickly repelled the attack. It will not bother me should I live my entire life without having to kill a man but I have to say I'm glad to be surrounded by a thousand 19 year-old Marines who can't wait to. They will be leaving in a few weeks and turning over the base to the Army. I will miss them.


"The only tents the Marines use are one-man pup tents and they are everywhere. Each foxhole and DFP (defensive fighting position) around the camp is accompanied by two of these humble little tents. "I have a renewed respect for the Marines. They arrived a month ago, dug in, and have been living out of these ridiculously small, 5 x 5 tents ever since. No heat, no latrines, no showers, nothing but backpacks, weapons, helmets and flak vests, and lots of ammo. And they've been doing it every day. Four man teams at each position, two sleeping, two on watch. God bless them every one."


GET SOME!!!

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Marines Doing What Marines Do Best. Iraq, 2003.

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